Treat Psoriasis Seriously–World Psoriasis Day 2018

 

Today, October 29th, is World Psoriasis Day. Each year I look forward to this day as I think about the 125 million people around the world who understand on some level what it means to live with psoriasis. Nobody needs to feel alone with this disease.

This special day each year is sponsored by the International Federation of Psoriasis Associations (IFPA). I volunteer as a Psocial Ambassador (blogger) for a member association, the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF). The theme this year is PsoSerious: Treat Psoriasis Seriously. The NPF encourages those living with psoriasis to pledge https://www.psoriasis.org/world-psoriasis-day/pledge to take one action toward treating your psoriasis more seriously.

My World Psoriasis Day Action: Get a Flu Shot

A couple days ago I got a flu shot in honor of World Psoriasis Day. Three years ago, during Easter weekend, I truly had influenza. I experience high fever, extreme fatigue, and achy muscles among other symptoms. The doctors ruled out sepsis/infection with a blood test and at the same time tested for viruses. Sure enough, I had H3N2 Influenza A late in the flu season.

I sadly missed out on speaking at Good Friday Service and Easter Sunday Worship at church. I hated putting that extra work on my colleagues, but I could not even get out of bed. In twenty years of ministering in churches that Easter is the only one I have missed. On a different Easter weekend I even spoke on two hours of sleep as I kept watch over my sick daughter. Not much keeps me away from church on Sunday.

The worst part of getting Influenza A, though, was not work related. My psoriasis and eczema flares with fever, especially from bacterial and viral infections. It’s a huge trigger for me and I try to avoid getting sick at all costs because of it. That means getting a flu shot is important and necessary to manage my skin during the winter and spring seasons.

A worthy action for me in honor of World Psoriasis Day.


My psoriasis and eczema flares with fever, especially from bacterial and viral infections. It’s a huge trigger for me and I try to avoid getting sick at all costs because of it.


Take Psoriasis Seriously

This year’s World Psoriasis Day resonates with me for another reason as well: psoriasis is serious business. I shared a frustrating part of my psoriasis story at the Experience Innovation Network’s CXO Roundtable in San Francisco last Tuesday. I sat at Table 7 as the patient partner in a design workshop meant for healthcare executives. The workshop led the participants through the steps of designing healthcare around the patient from the beginning of the process. The challenge I presented before my table involved my multiple insurance denials for combination therapy.

As I voiced the story of using multiple treatments to treat recalcitrant psoriasis since childhood I could see the deep concern and compassion on the participants’ faces. They felt frustrated along with me as I told about an inflexible insurance provider that would not cover two expensive medications that I needed to properly treat my psoriasis.

I know I am a few weeks away from becoming covered from head to toe with psoriatic lesions if treatment fails me completely. I can’t stomach the thought of returning to the misery and pain of red, painful, hot, and itchy lesions all over my body. When my skin is flaring that much I can’t hide it all under clothes as I would want to. Unwelcome stares and questions invariably follow me wherever I go.

I’ve also learned how psoriasis causes inflammation throughout my body, not just on my skin. I hate hearing about those studies that show that those with psoriasis are at a higher risk for cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and other autoimmune conditions as comorbidities. With severe psoriasis and lots of inflammation over the years I just might die younger than I otherwise would have.


I’ve also learned how psoriasis causes inflammation throughout my body, not just on my skin.


Indeed, it goes without saying that I must take seriously adopting changes and treatments that minimize those impacts psoriasis might have on my quality and longevity of life.

But Not Too Seriously

At the same time, I’m learning to not take psoriasis too seriously. It’s easy for me to lock my mind and emotions with my condition. I am obviously more than my psoriasis, and life is more than clearing my skin inflammation. I don’t need to take myself or my psoriasis too seriously.

My wife Lori recently reminded me the important role laughter has in healing. I fell in love with her infectious laughter, and her ability to laugh together at some otherwise painful circumstances and challenging situations. We had a silly moment in Wal Mart where we wore plush masks out late on a shopping date (should’ve purchased these for Halloween!)

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Life gets too serious sometimes, so I need to continue to find ways to bring some levity and perspective even in the midst of insurance denials, flaring skin, and frustrating treatments.


Check out the Treaments Tried page for my personal experience taking Otezla and Tremfya!


Personal Family Update: Taking Care of Mom

Finally, I want to give a family update that has impacted my life, including my blogging and social media advocacy. My mom learned she has advanced stage lymphoma a couple months ago. I’ve been flying to Southern California every three weeks to accompany her to oncology appointments and chemotherapy infusions. As I write this I am on my way to Orange County to take mom to the infusion center in Irvine, CA the next two days.

I love my parents dearly and am glad I can be an hour away to help them when needed. Unfortunately, I’ve needed to take a break from writing as work at church, family, and personal health took precedence. Praying mom responds well to treatment and can experience remission after these courses of treatment.

 

 

 

Joining NPF on Capitol Hill

Lori and I in Sacramento for California Advocacy Day with the National Psoriasis Foundation in 2017. The NPF produced this graphic for a tweet promoting the upcoming Capitol Hill day on March 20, 2018. 

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Last year I very much looked forward to attending the National Psoriasis Foundation’s Capitol Hill Day in the nation’s capital. Alas, due to inclement weather and subsequent flight cancellations, I didn’t make it. I wrote Not Going to DC After All, But . . . to share my sadness. While I did conference call into a couple of congressional meetings, I missed meeting psoriasis patient and research advocates, as well as congressional staffers, in person.

This year I’m hoping the storms hold off long enough for my flight to land at Ronald Reagan National Airport on Sunday evening. If they do I’ll not only check off another item off of my psoriasis bucket list, but also join in a cause I’ve become increasingly passionate about.

Growing in Psoriasis Advocacy

For years I envisioned myself as a volunteer coordinator for building psoriasis community locally. I joined the NPFs Los Angeles community division a decade ago and started the San Gabriel Psoriasis Support Group meeting at a local Kaiser facility. Although that group did not continue after I moved back to Northern California, I felt the monthly gathering made an impact.

In Northern California the NPF Community Division Manager gave me the vision of establishing a group in the Sacramento area. We hosted More Than Skin Deep and Team NPF Walk events over the past few years. However, during this time I felt the tug to focus more time on writing blogs and on local advocacy.

I attended the first advocacy day in Sacramento a few years ago where the NPF teamed up with the Arthritis Foundation and other groups to support state legislation. Some bills we lobbied for included striking down step therapy, promoting continuation of care, and developing standards for biosimilars.

Before one of the California Advocacy days the NPF called to ask me to represent the organization in support of a bill. I took off a morning from work to sit in on a health committee meeting. I waited for my moment to stand in line and express support for the bill. That day the NPF staffer told me I became a lobbyist.

Recently I joined the NPF’s Western Advocacy Action Network representing California. Next week I’m taking my very amateur lobbyist skills to Washington D.C. for the first time. I didn’t expect to become involved to this level in legislative advocacy, but I see the power of influencing government for the greater good of the patient community.

Travel and Psocial Ambassador Training

Getting to D.C. is a daunting proposition, however. Living on the West Coast has a few disadvantages. One of them is traveling to the East Coast for meetings. Since my first meetings with the NPF Psocial Ambassador group starts at noon on Monday morning, I need to travel on Sunday afternoon.

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With speaking at 9 a.m. and teaching a class at 10:30 a.m. at church, the best flight out of Sacramento for me is in the early afternoon. I already know I will be exhausted with the packing, preparation for the lessons, speaking/teaching, and travel through Chicago’s O’Hare airport. I don’t arrive in D.C. until around 11:45 p.m.

Sunday is my big work day that takes everything out of me. Traveling and two days of meetings will be challenging, especially with the time change.

But it’s worth it. I can’t think of a better way to spend those couple days giving myself to a cause I deeply believe in. I’m also looking forward to meeting the other two dozen plus patient advocates who will attend.

I plan to update how things are going during and after the trip. Definitely looking forward to all those couple days have in store for the Foundation and me.

 

 

 

 

28 Weeks with Tremfya: Still Working? (Injection #5)

March 5th finally arrived–injection day. The time came for the fifth dose of Tremfya (guselkumab) twenty-eight weeks after starting this treatment journey with it in August.

To prepare I carefully laid out the syringe, the instruction booklet, information sheet, a cotton ball, and alcohol wipe on my desk. As I waited for the medication to warm up for a few minutes my thoughts began to wander.

Would I take Tremfya if my insurance didn’t pay for the approximately ten thousand dollars per injection?

Is there any chance for even greater improvement as I go into the second half of a year taking it?

Will any long-term side effects eventually pop up if I take Tremfya over a long period?

As I grabbed the syringe I figured the answers are 1) no–it’s way too expensive, 2) probably not–I’ve probably seen what it can do already, and 3) I hope not–and that scares me to these three questions. I submitted to the fact that I can’t know everything I want to know about taking a new medication even after using it for over half a year.

Thankfully, the needle and medication went under my skin with no issues. Not even a tiny drop of blood emerged as the needle pulled out. Now it’s time to wait to see how effective this injection will be for weeks 28 to 36, and would it follow the pattern I’ve observed with the past couple injections.

The Pattern Continues

In 24 Weeks with Tremfya: A Pattern Emerges I discussed a pattern I observed with the eight week between injections. About two weeks before the next injection my psoriasis worsens. Then two weeks after the injection my psoriasis begins to improve again. I most enjoy the four weeks in between.

During the previous eight weeks I did have a nagging respiratory injection that seemed to worsen both my psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. While it’s possible the break out is due to the lingering effects of infection, I also see it as a potential confirmation of the pattern I described.

This picture I took earlier this week shows how my psoriasis broke out some on my lower back and upper arms. Continue reading →

Not Going to DC After All, But . . .

I will still join the National Psoriasis Foundation‘s Capitol Hill visits remotely! It will be an early call, but I’m glad I can still participate even though I won’t be there in person. A couple years ago I visited the local office of my congressman. I definitely look forward to chatting with John Garamendi’s staff in Washington D.C. too.

The winter storm #Stella unfortunately canceled my flight from Phoenix to Washington DC’s Reagan airport. I found out when I woke up for my first flight out of Sacramento. Sadly, although I knew cancellation was a possibility, it became a reality as I saw the alert in the wee hours of the morning. I’m still in some kind of denial, as I still haven’t unpacked my bags.

I do welcome the rest, though. Last week’s trip to Orlando for the American Academy of Dermatology annual meeting, and a week full of work at church tired me out. Yesterday I spoke in two consecutive church services on short sleep after Daylight Savings Time. My wife rejoiced when she found out I would stay home, worried that I might fly into a blizzard, and knowing how busy I’ve been recently.

This afternoon I finally got around to working on a couple chores I’d put off for weeks: washing the cars, and mowing the lawns. Now I’m spending time catching up on emails and blogging. I spent some much needed time with the kids, too, with my son helping me with the work.

Even though I’m not going to DC, I hope to go next time. And I get to enjoy the 80 degree weather here in Sacramento. It’s disappointing, but not all bad.