85 Weeks with Tremfya: Finally a New Dosing Schedule

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The view from my office during a heavy thunderstorm. A fitting picture of how I’ve felt the last couple weeks with worsening skin conditions.

My how time passes. Almost six hundred days in fact since I started using Tremfya (guselkumab) to treat recalcitrant psoriasis. The twelfth injection three weeks ago held special significance as the first dose at the new every six-week dose schedule. With two extra syringes from my dermatologist I can try out every six-week dosing for about a year.

I figured since Week 24 that if I could take Tremfya more frequently I could avoid the inevitable flare that comes at the last two weeks before I get my last dose. Now with two extra boxes in my refrigerator I could try it out.

Thanks to my Doctor

First of all, I want to give credit where credit is due. My dermatologist, Dr. Christie Carroll, offered two sample injections to me late last year after my insurance provider denied our request for every six-week dosing.

She took the initiative to sign them out to me and wrote a note with my name on them. She mentioned, unfortunately, that she might not be able to give me more samples in the future as she faced pressure to give up samples. I don’t understand all the ins and outs of why she might not be able to get Tremfya for me in the future. But I’m glad that she looked out for me to find a way to try it.


Follow my Tremfya journey!

Tremfya (Guselkumab) Week One  

3 Weeks with Tremfya: The Waiting Game

8 Weeks with Tremfya: It’s Working!

16 Weeks with Tremfya: The Verdict?

24 Weeks with Tremfya: A Pattern Emerges

38 Weeks with Tremfya: The Q&A Edition

42 Weeks with Tremfya: Coping with a Skin Flare

Tremfya is much, much harder to get than I imagined

One Year with Tremfya: Can’t Get Enough!


Is My Skin Better with More Frequent Dosing?

The quick answer is not really.

Almost four weeks into the new dosing schedule I cannot say that I notice as much improvement than I expected. I hoped to side step that flare, but it came anyhow. Along with the psoriasis dotting my trunk, legs, and arms, my eczema flared badly as well. I’ve lost sleep, concentration and productivity due to the constant itchiness and irritation.

I can think of a few problems with making any conclusions about the effectiveness of this dosing. Continue reading →

One Year with Tremfya: Can’t Get Enough!

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I love visiting my parents in Orange County, California, especially going to the beach. But this last time around my psoriasis flared during the trip and is only slowly calming down.

The anniversary of my first injection of Tremfya (Guselkumab) came and went in late August. In a way it’s a good sign that the time went by quickly, for as the saying goes, I had more freedom and fun while it knocked down skin inflammation. In fact, I can’t get enough of Tremfya.

Why Can’t I Get More?

Soon after starting Tremfya I recognized a pattern that continues to this day: about six weeks into the eight-week injection cycle the psoriasis begins to break out. It’s a thin, red, guttate type psoriasis. I call it a “thousand points of psoriasis” lighting up my skin. Lots of little dots or eraser head size lesions that peel and leave a dark pink to red raw skin underneath.

I call it a “thousand points of psoriasis” lighting up my skin. Lots of little dots or eraser head size lesions that peel leave a dark pink to red raw skin underneath.

I asked Dr. Carroll, my new dermatologist starting here in 2018, if I could take Tremfya more frequently. Ideally, I could get an injection every four weeks, but I asked for every six weeks. Predictably, my insurance denier provider said no. Upon appeal they also said no.

Like a petulant child I thought I could proverbially stomp the ground by appealing until I broke the insurance company down to give out another couple injection a year. But they are stubborn, like I am as a parent. I asked why and they gave me the “there are no studies to substantiate the effectiveness of taking Tremfya more frequently,” and the “FDA approves Tremfya for every eight weeks” so you are out of luck kind of answers.

I get it. It’s $10k for one injection. But that one or two extra injections could make a huge difference in my quality of life. Thankfully, they approved the normal dosage so that my quality of life is substantially improve already.

But wow it would be great to get a little more.

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Here is my right arm taken on September 18, 2018 at the end of my eight week Tremfya cycle. Relatively flat, red spots that more peel than flake and not itchy. They tend to start going away a couple weeks after taking the injection.

It Would Be Great for Stress Events

It’s not just that I want to pry the insurance provider’s fingers off of that precious box of Tremfya comes in for selfish gain. I need it for those stressful times I’m working at the church, helping out the family, or madly meeting blog deadlines. Continue reading →

Tremfya is much, much harder to get than I imagined

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I took this photo of the sunset over the ocean on last month’s Alaska cruise. It reminds me of calmer waters and more joyful times as I persisted in getting my Tremfya prescription right over the past few weeks since.

The journey began in May simply enough: get Tremfya renewed for another year at a new specialty pharmacy. I have continued to use my previous dermatologist’s prescription this year, but with a new doctor I needed a new prescription at a differeent pharmacy starting this summer.

My dermatologist and I decided to request every 6-week dosing, which we both thought would be denied. But it was worth a try, right? No. Denial came swiftly and ended up costing me a lot of time waiting and on the phone.


My dermatologist and I decided to request every 6-week dosing, which we both thought would be denied. But it was worth a try, right? No.


For me simple is never that simple when it comes to getting the newer, more expensive (good) medications to treat severe psoriasis.

(Barely) Qualifying to Receive Tremfya Coverage

After the DENIAL for every 6-week dosing schedule for Tremfya, I was glad to see they approved every 8-week schedule. It’s what I expected anyhow since it makes financial sense for the insurance provider to not pay more than it has to, even though I’ve shown I need a higher frequency dosing.

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With that letter describing how 6-week dosing is not covered, WHA did explain the criteria for receiving coverage for Tremfya. I couldn’t believe how incredibly restrictive the criteria are, including failing two of the newer medications/biologics:

WHA [Western Health Advantage] covers Tremfya when all the following criteria is met:

[1] when prescribed for moderate to severe plaque psoriasis confirmed by a dermatologist (psoriasis affects 10% or more of the body; psoriasis involves hands, feet, and neck or genitalia).

AND

[2] prescribed by a dermatologist

AND

[3] the patient has tried and failed topical therapy (e.g., Dovonex, Tazorac, or other topical steroids),

AND

[4] documented failure or clinically significant adverse effects to one of the following therapies alone or in combination, unless contraindicated: methotrexate or (if methotrexate in contraindicated) cyclosporine, acitretin, or a trial with PUVA or UVB for at least 3 months unless intolerant,

AND

[5] documented failure or significant adverse effects to at least two of the following: Humira, Otezla, Stelara, or Cosentyx.

Initial approvals are considered for 3 months to assess patient’s response and renewals for one year.


I couldn’t believe how incredibly restrictive the criteria are to receive Tremfya, including failing two of the newer medications/biologics.


This is how I imagine the insurance provider reviewer went about his job when fe came to my case: Continue reading →

42 Weeks with Tremfya: Coping with a Skin Flare

Beautiful flowers in Sitka, Alaska, taken during a stop on our summer Alaska cruise vacation with family.

A couple weeks ago marked the 42nd week on Tremfya (guselkumab) and the 7th injection. I started in mid-August last year with about ten months elapsed since that first injection on the day of solar eclipse in August.

At this point in my treatment cycle I hoped to have more stability with my skin. But skin flares do happen even while taking the best medications.

What a Bad Skin Flare

Somehow I think that if I’m taking a super expensive biologic for psoriasis that I’m entitled to clear skin. Expectations often wreak havoc on my mood when I think this way. As an optimist and idealist it’s quite easy to bring those unrealistic expectations to the new medications I take.

When my skin flared like a wind swept wildfire a month ago I felt overwhelmed. Between the darker red spreading psoriasis spots and the generalized bumpy rash all over my body I could only feel normal skin in a few places. My mood darkened as I went into coping mode.

When my skin flared like a wind swept wildfire a month ago I felt overwhelmed.

A few factors appeared to contribute to the flare: increasing phototherapy dosage too quickly; Tremfya losing effectiveness at the end of the 8 week cycle; completely stopping cyclosporine; stress at work with a demanding spring; and a busy schedule with end of school year activities for the kids.


Follow my Tremfya journey!

Tremfya (Guselkumab) Week One  

3 Weeks with Tremfya: The Waiting Game

8 Weeks with Tremfya: It’s Working!

12 Weeks with Tremfya: The Third Injection

16 Weeks with Tremfya: The Verdict?

20 Weeks with Tremfya: Read the Instructions! (4th Injection)

24 Weeks with Tremfya: A Pattern Emerges

28 Weeks with Tremfya: Still Working? (Injection #5)

38 Weeks with Tremfya: The Q&A Edition


Employing Poor Coping Strategies

I’m not proud to report that during the flare I didn’t cope well at all. I did continue my skin care routines including taking a break from phototherapy and using steroids with wet wraps a couple times. But my expanding gut tells me that I ate way too much junk food. All those pastries, ice cream, donuts, extra shots of espresso, greasy burgers, and chips of all sorts no doubt made my skin even worse.

I also tend to stay up later when my skin flares. In an ineffective attempt at avoiding caring for my skin I delay my shower and night time skin routines. Instead I play games on my cell phone, (binge) watch Netflix shows, work on emails, or read online sports news. Eventually I get going on what I need to do, but much later than I’d like. The next day I’m naturally tired and wanting naps in the afternoon.

I really could use more margin in my life for when difficulties like skin flares inevitably come. It’s not that I don’t know better ways to cope when my health tanks. But if I’m already tired and stressed I don’t have the will nor the energy to counter those cravings to eat junk food and stay up late.

I really could use more margin in my life for when difficulties like skin flares inevitably come.

Thankfully, vacation came at a great time. A week on an Alaska cruise settled my mind, gave me much needed time away from work, and allowed the new Tremfya injection to start working.

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Waterfall next to Mendenhall Glacier in Juneau, Alaska

Treatment: A Work in Progress

I hear stories of how long it takes to finally find a treatment plan that effectively manages psoriasis while minimizes risk. Some people go through multiple treatments, including combinations of various medications such as topical, phototherapy, systemic pills, and injectable biologics.

I feel like I’ve been trying to find that elusive treatment plan for the past twelve years. When the systemic Soriatane with phototherapy stopped working for me in the mid-2000s my skin would not stop peeling and scaling. Pure misery. I tried new biologics, went back to methotrexate, and even tried coal tar. Nothing worked.

Cyclosporine turned out to be the most effective medication for my psoriasis and eczema. However, it is only FDA approved for psoriasis for one year because of it’s toxicity to the kidney and other side effects. I used cyclosporine off and on for the next decade while trying each new biologic, although the breaks would only last a couple months before I needed to start up again.

Psoriasis treatment just feels like a work in progress, especially when that bad flare comes along unexpectedly.

Now I’ve finally stopped cyclosporine while taking Tremfya and experimenting with phototherapy. Psoriasis treatment just feels like a work in progress, especially when that bad flare comes along unexpectedly.

Time to end this entry with a photo of a cool glacier in Alaska to remember those calmer days. Too bad I can’t just go back here whenever my skin flares!

Margerite Glacier

Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska

The Home Phototherapy Unit Arrives!

A few weeks ago the narrowband ultraviolet B light (NUVB) panel finally arrived. My dermatologist and I decided to try home phototherapy after determining that Tremfya (guselkumab) alone would not adequately suppress my psoriasis or address my atopic dermatitis.

I gave up, though, after my health insurance denier provider rejected the initial prescription, the first appeal, and then the appeal to the denial. I know I shouldn’t stop fighting, but I figured I needed to choose my battles wisely. I lost this round and that was that.

A Gift Arrives Via Freight Truck

As the delivery truck pulled up to my driveway I thought about how a couple dozen people generously gave to the GoFundMe campaign started by a parishioner at church. The over four thousand dollars raised allowed me to order, and now take delivery, of a Daavlin Series 7 eight bulb NUVB panel with dosimetry timer.

The over two hundred thirty pound wooden box initially looked like a crudely constructed coffin. But inside contained another tool in the arsenal to combat inflammatory immune responses on my skin. Here I’m holding the protective grills that install over each pair of six foot light bulbs:

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Continue reading →

2nd Dermatology Visit: Waiting and Delaying Treatments

This time I made it on time for my dermatology appointment. After the first visit to my new dermatologist almost turned out a disaster, I made sure to double check the appointment time. Yes, I needed to make it to the clinic on Tuesday at 10:00 a.m. for this second visit.

You’d think that after four decades of seeing doctors I would feel comfortable at clinic appointments. But in those few minutes I spend with the dermatologist decisions will be made about my health that will impact my life for weeks to come.

With a new dermatologist and healthcare provider system I felt intense anxiety for that appointment. My elevated blood pressure told the same story: seeing the doctor is a stressful event for me. Even so, I overcame my anxieties to closely collaborate with Dr. Carroll on what’s next for my skin treatments.

Getting Acquainted

Thankfully, the doctor visit went much better than I expected. At the outset I spent a couple minutes getting acquainted with Dr. Carroll. I first shared my psoriasis column on Everyday Health, The Itch to Beat Psoriasis with her. I also talked about my volunteer work with the National Psoriasis Foundation. Dr. Carroll shared how she studied under a prominent psoriasis researcher and physician and supported the Foundation’s efforts. She explained her philosophy of putting patients first, even if they are late like I was last time.

I thought the exchange helped to break the ice and develop rapport. I hoped that by sharing some of my life with psoriasis she could trust I knew my skin conditions well enough to input on treatment decisions. I also felt more comfortable that, based on her training and experience, she could manage the challenging case that is my psoriasis and atopic dermatitis.

Besides getting to know a new healthcare system and my new dermatologist, I needed to consult with her on a couple issues looming for my health and skin care.

Tremfya Adjustment

I’m convinced now that the pattern I saw emerging with my psoriasis on Tremfya treatment at week 24 continues. The normal dosing schedule for Tremfya is one injection every eight weeks. By week six or so, however, my psoriasis tends to begin to worsen. It takes two or three weeks after the injection to get back to a more controlled state–if at all.

I would like to try taking it every 4 weeks, but that would double the injections to 13 annually. With a cost of ~$10,000 per injection you can do the math. Every 8 weeks is about 6.5 injections per year, with every 6 weeks about 9 injections. Continue reading →

38 Weeks with Tremfya: The Q&A Edition

Cloud Gate (a.k.a The Bean) in Millenium Park, Chicago. I’m clearly thinking about the Questions about Tremfya included in this PsoHoward blog entry.

This past week I joined the HealtheVoices conferencein Chicago for the fourth straight year.  Here’s a description of the conference: “In an effort to connect, support and further empower the online health advocate community, Janssen created HealtheVoices™ – a groundbreaking leadership conference created exclusively for those using social platforms to advocate for themselves and their communities.”

I absolutely love how this conference brings people from forty different chronic disease conditions together to get inspired, connected and empowered. Before the conference started a group of psoriasis advocates joined Janssen to discuss Tremfya (guselkumab). A perfect lead into today’s blog topic.

Tremfya Question/Answer

My psoriasis update is not super exciting. I’m mostly stable, with more psoriasis breaking through than before. I just passed the week 38 mark, about two and a half weeks after taking my sixth injection of Tremfya. I hope to include an unboxing of my new phototherapy light panel that’s slated for delivery at the end of the week. Stay tuned!

In the meantime, I’ve noticed various search terms and questions about Tremfya  that have led readers to PsoHoward.com. Below you can find the top queries and my thoughts on each one as I journey with Tremfya.

[Disclaimer: Please note that I am not a medical doctor, nor do I have the definitive answer on these questions. The responses are from what I’ve experienced so far on Tremfya as a patient, or from talking to healthcare providers and a Janssen representative at the Medical Information and Services group.]

How often do you take Tremfya?

The dosing at first was a bit confusing, but didn’t take too long to figure out. I started with a “loading dose” which consisted of Week 0 as the first injection, then Week 4 as the next dose. After those first two injections I was instructed to take it every 8 weeks (week 12, week 20, week 28, etc.).

I recently asked my dermatologist and Janssen about more frequent dosing, perhaps every four or six weeks. Since the label use is for every eight weeks after the initial loading doses, my doctor will need to submit an exception to insurance. I’m not holding my breath.

Does the Tremfya injection hurt?

The first injection caused me some anxiety as detailed in my first Tremfya blog. in years past I used an injection pen with Enbrel. I would press it on the skin (usually my belly or on my leg) and then push the button. The Tremfya injection uses a syringe with a small needle. The injections do not hurt at all. In fact, I can see the needle go into my skin, but do not really feel much as it goes in.

I did use a syringe previously with Enbrel about a decade ago, which prepared and somewhat trained me for Tremfya. The first Tremfya injection I took at the dermatology clinic with a nurse observing. I’m glad I did as I felt safer in case I had any unusual reaction.

Ask about training for self-injection if you are feeling anxious about it at all.

How long before I see results with Tremfya?

This question is by far the most frequent one asked in searches that led to PsoHoward. It’s the question I had foremost on my mind so I’m not surprised. I hated that my health providers told me to be patient. But that’s the truth about many psoriasis treatments I’ve tried: it takes the time it’s going to take.

It makes sense that response rates depend on the individual, although studies and graphs show the overall trends. I started noticing some improvement on my extremities, lower legs and arms, within a few weeks. But my dermatologist told me to wait a bit longer as the data showed response rates coming later into the ten to twelve week time frame. The pharmacist said the same. Around week 8, I excitedly saw a good response, although improvement continued for a few weeks longer before leveling off.


Follow my Tremfya journey!

Tremfya (Guselkumab) Week One  

3 Weeks with Tremfya: The Waiting Game

6 Weeks with Tremfya: Redefining Expectations

8 Weeks with Tremfya: It’s Working!

12 Weeks with Tremfya: The Third Injection

16 Weeks with Tremfya: The Verdict?

20 Weeks with Tremfya: Read the Instructions! (4th Injection)

24 Weeks with Tremfya: A Pattern Emerges

28 Weeks with Tremfya: Still Working? (Injection #5)

42 Weeks with Tremfya: Coping with a Skin Flare


Does my skin itch with Tremfya?

I don’t have a great answer for this question as my skin always itches. However, I can say that my psoriasis does not itch as much as the inflammation lessened overall on my body. A few new spots broke out along the way that felt itchy, but they faded in a couple weeks like the other spots. I do have a comment about my scalp, though. See below.

Will Tremfya clear my scalp psoriasis?

My scalp itches quite a bit with scalp psoriasis. Tremfya data shows good response for scalp psoriasis, but unfortunately not so much for me. Definitely not as bad as without treatment–no large flakes peeling off my scalp–but not as good as I hoped.

See the Tremfya prescribing informationfor more details about scalp psoriasis from Janssen.

Is Tremfya for eczema?

At first I feared Tremfya caused my eczema to worsen, but I never could substantiate any causal relationship between injecting Tremfya and worsening or improving eczema. Either way, it is not indicated for atopic dermatitis at this time, which means I need to find a different way to treat my eczema.

What do I do if my insurance won’t cover Tremfya?

I hate that when I start a discussion with my dermatologist about a new treatment we invariably talk about insurance coverage. I have faced insurance denials in the recent past for Otezla, and also for a home phototherapy unitI thought I might for Tremfya as well. Thankfully, insurance provider approved my taking Tremfya, although it took a few weeks for the system at the specialty pharmacy to get it to me because it was new back last summer.

My dermatologist did tell me at the time, though, that I would get the medication one way or another. At that time the manufacturer Janssen provided the medication for a time for certain individuals who could not receive it through insurance.

I would personally go to Janssen’s CarePath Tremfya website to ask their representatives, or to the National Psoriasis Foundation’s Patient Navigator Center with insurance issues that arise.

Does Tremfya give you high blood pressure?

My blood pressure hasn’t elevated that I can tell since taking Tremfya. The Janssen Medical Information and Services representative said that elevated blood pressure is “not something reported or seen in clinical trials or post marketing data.” Certainly something to talk to your doctor about if you have a concern.

Is it okay to take a dose of Tremfya a week late?

The Janssen representative said that it wasn’t studied that way–taking it later than the regular dosing schedule. She said that if you are late, the risk is for the disease to break through. She added the importance of sticking to the interval period as much as possible.

Can I drink while taking Tremfya?

I happen to not drink alcohol, not for religious reasons, but because it flares my skin conditions. Janssen said there is no specific concern or direct contraindication to drinking alcohol with Tremfya, but ask your doctor.

Do you have any questions about my experience with Tremfya not covered here? Feel free to leave a comment or message me and I’ll be sure to respond to those.