psoriasis, Psoriasis Treatments

2nd Dermatology Visit: Waiting and Delaying Treatments

This time I made it on time for my dermatology appointment. After the first visit to my new dermatologist almost turned out a disaster, I made sure to double check the appointment time. Yes, I needed to make it to the clinic on Tuesday at 10:00 a.m. for this second visit.

You’d think that after four decades of seeing doctors I would feel comfortable at clinic appointments. But in those few minutes I spend with the dermatologist decisions will be made about my health that will impact my life for weeks to come.

With a new dermatologist and healthcare provider system I felt intense anxiety for that appointment. My elevated blood pressure told the same story: seeing the doctor is a stressful event for me. Even so, I overcame my anxieties to closely collaborate with Dr. Carroll on what’s next for my skin treatments.

Getting Acquainted

Thankfully, the doctor visit went much better than I expected. At the outset I spent a couple minutes getting acquainted with Dr. Carroll. I first shared my psoriasis column on Everyday Health, The Itch to Beat Psoriasis with her. I also talked about my volunteer work with the National Psoriasis Foundation. Dr. Carroll shared how she studied under a prominent psoriasis researcher and physician and supported the Foundation’s efforts. She explained her philosophy of putting patients first, even if they are late like I was last time.

I thought the exchange helped to break the ice and develop rapport. I hoped that by sharing some of my life with psoriasis she could trust I knew my skin conditions well enough to input on treatment decisions. I also felt more comfortable that, based on her training and experience, she could manage the challenging case that is my psoriasis and atopic dermatitis.

Besides getting to know a new healthcare system and my new dermatologist, I needed to consult with her on a couple issues looming for my health and skin care.

Tremfya Adjustment

I’m convinced now that the pattern I saw emerging with my psoriasis on Tremfya treatment at week 24 continues. The normal dosing schedule for Tremfya is one injection every eight weeks. By week six or so, however, my psoriasis tends to begin to worsen. It takes two or three weeks after the injection to get back to a more controlled state–if at all.

I would like to try taking it every 4 weeks, but that would double the injections to 13 annually. With a cost of ~$10,000 per injection you can do the math. Every 8 weeks is about 6.5 injections per year, with every 6 weeks about 9 injections. Continue reading

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psoriasis, Psoriasis Treatments

38 Weeks with Tremfya: The Q&A Edition

Cloud Gate (a.k.a The Bean) in Millenium Park, Chicago. I’m clearly thinking about the Questions about Tremfya included in this PsoHoward blog entry.

This past week I joined the HealtheVoices conferencein Chicago for the fourth straight year.  Here’s a description of the conference: “In an effort to connect, support and further empower the online health advocate community, Janssen created HealtheVoices™ – a groundbreaking leadership conference created exclusively for those using social platforms to advocate for themselves and their communities.”

I absolutely love how this conference brings people from forty different chronic disease conditions together to get inspired, connected and empowered. Before the conference started a group of psoriasis advocates joined Janssen to discuss Tremfya (guselkumab). A perfect lead into today’s blog topic.

Tremfya Question/Answer

My psoriasis update is not super exciting. I’m mostly stable, with more psoriasis breaking through than before. I just passed the week 38 mark, about two and a half weeks after taking my sixth injection of Tremfya. I hope to include an unboxing of my new phototherapy light panel that’s slated for delivery at the end of the week. Stay tuned!

In the meantime, I’ve noticed various search terms and questions about Tremfya  that have led readers to PsoHoward.com. Below you can find the top queries and my thoughts on each one as I journey with Tremfya.

[Disclaimer: Please note that I am not a medical doctor, nor do I have the definitive answer on these questions. The responses are from what I’ve experienced so far on Tremfya as a patient, or from talking to healthcare providers and a Janssen representative at the Medical Information and Services group.]

How often do you take Tremfya?

The dosing at first was a bit confusing, but didn’t take too long to figure out. I started with a “loading dose” which consisted of Week 0 as the first injection, then Week 4 as the next dose. After those first two injections I was instructed to take it every 8 weeks (week 12, week 20, week 28, etc.).

I recently asked my dermatologist and Janssen about more frequent dosing, perhaps every four or six weeks. Since the label use is for every eight weeks after the initial loading doses, my doctor will need to submit an exception to insurance. I’m not holding my breath.

Does the Tremfya injection hurt?

The first injection caused me some anxiety as detailed in my first Tremfya blog. in years past I used an injection pen with Enbrel. I would press it on the skin (usually my belly or on my leg) and then push the button. The Tremfya injection uses a syringe with a small needle. The injections do not hurt at all. In fact, I can see the needle go into my skin, but do not really feel much as it goes in.

I did use a syringe previously with Enbrel about a decade ago, which prepared and somewhat trained me for Tremfya. The first Tremfya injection I took at the dermatology clinic with a nurse observing. I’m glad I did as I felt safer in case I had any unusual reaction.

Ask about training for self-injection if you are feeling anxious about it at all.

How long before I see results with Tremfya?

This question is by far the most frequent one asked in searches that led to PsoHoward. It’s the question I had foremost on my mind so I’m not surprised. I hated that my health providers told me to be patient. But that’s the truth about many psoriasis treatments I’ve tried: it takes the time it’s going to take.

It makes sense that response rates depend on the individual, although studies and graphs show the overall trends. I started noticing some improvement on my extremities, lower legs and arms, within a few weeks. But my dermatologist told me to wait a bit longer as the data showed response rates coming later into the ten to twelve week time frame. The pharmacist said the same. Around week 8, I excitedly saw a good response, although improvement continued for a few weeks longer before leveling off.


Follow my Tremfya journey!

Tremfya (Guselkumab) Week One  

3 Weeks with Tremfya: The Waiting Game

6 Weeks with Tremfya: Redefining Expectations

8 Weeks with Tremfya: It’s Working!

12 Weeks with Tremfya: The Third Injection

16 Weeks with Tremfya: The Verdict?

20 Weeks with Tremfya: Read the Instructions! (4th Injection)

24 Weeks with Tremfya: A Pattern Emerges

28 Weeks with Tremfya: Still Working? (Injection #5)

42 Weeks with Tremfya: Coping with a Skin Flare


Does my skin itch with Tremfya?

I don’t have a great answer for this question as my skin always itches. However, I can say that my psoriasis does not itch as much as the inflammation lessened overall on my body. A few new spots broke out along the way that felt itchy, but they faded in a couple weeks like the other spots. I do have a comment about my scalp, though. See below.

Will Tremfya clear my scalp psoriasis?

My scalp itches quite a bit with scalp psoriasis. Tremfya data shows good response for scalp psoriasis, but unfortunately not so much for me. Definitely not as bad as without treatment–no large flakes peeling off my scalp–but not as good as I hoped.

See the Tremfya prescribing informationfor more details about scalp psoriasis from Janssen.

Is Tremfya for eczema?

At first I feared Tremfya caused my eczema to worsen, but I never could substantiate any causal relationship between injecting Tremfya and worsening or improving eczema. Either way, it is not indicated for atopic dermatitis at this time, which means I need to find a different way to treat my eczema.

What do I do if my insurance won’t cover Tremfya?

I hate that when I start a discussion with my dermatologist about a new treatment we invariably talk about insurance coverage. I have faced insurance denials in the recent past for Otezla, and also for a home phototherapy unitI thought I might for Tremfya as well. Thankfully, insurance provider approved my taking Tremfya, although it took a few weeks for the system at the specialty pharmacy to get it to me because it was new back last summer.

My dermatologist did tell me at the time, though, that I would get the medication one way or another. At that time the manufacturer Janssen provided the medication for a time for certain individuals who could not receive it through insurance.

I would personally go to Janssen’s CarePath Tremfya website to ask their representatives, or to the National Psoriasis Foundation’s Patient Navigator Center with insurance issues that arise.

Does Tremfya give you high blood pressure?

My blood pressure hasn’t elevated that I can tell since taking Tremfya. The Janssen Medical Information and Services representative said that elevated blood pressure is “not something reported or seen in clinical trials or post marketing data.” Certainly something to talk to your doctor about if you have a concern.

Is it okay to take a dose of Tremfya a week late?

The Janssen representative said that it wasn’t studied that way–taking it later than the regular dosing schedule. She said that if you are late, the risk is for the disease to break through. She added the importance of sticking to the interval period as much as possible.

Can I drink while taking Tremfya?

I happen to not drink alcohol, not for religious reasons, but because it flares my skin conditions. Janssen said there is no specific concern or direct contraindication to drinking alcohol with Tremfya, but ask your doctor.

Do you have any questions about my experience with Tremfya not covered here? Feel free to leave a comment or message me and I’ll be sure to respond to those.

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Living with Psoriasis, psoriasis, Psoriasis Treatments

An Almost Disastrous First Dermatology Visit

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The empty lobby at the dermatology clinic at lunch time left me feeling quite anxious after I missed my 11:30 a.m. appointment, which I thought was at 1:30 p.m.

Wednesday morning started out quietly enough. I took the morning to rest as I had to work on my Monday day off. I looked forward to my first dermatology appointment at 1:30 p.m. I drove into town around 12:30 to give myself plenty of time. Then it dawned on me.

My dermatology appointment was at 11:30 a.m., not 1:30 p.m.

After double checking my calendar I decided to drive straight to the clinic. Even though the door was unlocked, I only found an “out to lunch” sign on the counter. A call to the scheduling center confirmed I missed my appointment. I’d waited over two months for this visit. Now I found myself one hour late to it.

The scheduler on the phone told me I could take the next available appointment with the dermatologist on May 8th, or with her colleague on May 2nd. She also gave me the option to stay in the clinic office until the staff returned from lunch. I opted for the latter.

As I waited all I could think about is what a disaster the first visit is turning out to be. Being late meant possibly not seeing the new dermatologist for weeks. One little mistake could mushroom into huge consequences for all my treatments.

As I waited all I could think about is what a disaster the first visit is turning out to be. Being late meant possibly not seeing the new dermatologist for weeks.

Awkward Beginnings

Finally, someone returned to the office. I sheepishly asked if she had started working yet, and shared how I felt embarrassed about missing my 11:30 appointment. The receptionist said it was okay, and took my information down. She then asked me to wait until the medical staff returned.

Dr. C’s medical assistant returned and started looking into my situation. He said they could work me into her schedule, but I needed to wait there for up to two hours. Ironically, I ended up getting a 1:45 p.m. appointment, only 15 minutes later than what I first thought. Around 2:00 p.m. the medical assistant called me into the exam room.

I felt anxious changing to a new medical group and system. Right off I felt awkward when I tried to sit on the exam table and asked for a gown.

“On the first visit the doctor likes you to keep your clothes on and sit in the chair,” the assistant informed me. I thought it sounded like rules for a first date, but went with it.

I felt anxious changing to a new medical group and system. Right off I felt awkward when I tried to sit on the exam table and asked for a gown.

Next, he told me the doctor is using an exam recording device that transmits to the Dominican Republic. It apparently helps with documentation so the doctor doesn’t need to worry about writing notes later. I didn’t want to make a fuss on my first visit and told him it would be fine.

Dr. C. walked in a few minutes later. She told me right away that she didn’t have that much time for the visit since I was being squeezed into her schedule.

Having no time to waste, I quickly dove into all my dermatology concerns assuming she could keep up. Continue reading

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psoriasis, Psoriasis Treatments

24 Weeks with Tremfya: A Pattern Emerges

Twenty-four weeks ago on Monday, August 21, 2017, I took my first injection of Tremfya (guselkumab) to treat my severe psoriasis. That day I witnessed a solar eclipse as I drove to the dermatology clinic in Sacramento. I recalled the day in grade school (February 26, 1979) when the last total solar eclipse occurred in the Northern Hemisphere. That’s around the time when the first psoriasis lesions emerged on my skin.

Over the course of those almost four decades between total solar eclipses I’ve battled severe psoriasis. Sadly, few treatments helped to effectively relieve the inflammation over those years.

I survived messy and smelly coal tar formulations, phototherapy burns, painful side effects of soriatane/etretinate, liver biopsies with methotrexate, rising blood pressure with cyclosporine, and five biologic mediations with injections. Not to mention the strange diets, supplements (I need write about the snake skin powder), alternative Chinese medications, and other unmentionables I tried to “cure” my psoriasis.

Over the course of those almost four decades between total solar eclipses I’ve battled severe psoriasis. Sadly, few treatments helped relieve the inflammation over those years.

Would Tremfya finally be the treatment to eclipse the nagging psoriasis all over my skin?

High Hopes and Expectations for Tremfya

Going into the clinic for my first injection I felt both excited and nervous. All those hopes and dreams of wanting to find “the one” treatment rested in that syringe full of medical innovation. That’s a lot of pressure and expectation on one treatment.

I knew before long that Tremfya would not be the cure I desired, even though it never promised to be one. By week 6 I began to redefine my expectations:

So, I’m lowering my expectations for Tremfya. I do hope this awesome new medication can beat the lowered expectations.  But if it can’t quite climb to the top of that mountain, I’ll take something less. I’ll take less than clear skin. I’ll accept if it needs something other than cyclosporine, such as phototherapy, or stronger topical treatments, to work more effectively at suppressing psoriasis.

Of course, I still hope it clears my skin in a couple months. But if it doesn’t by week seven or eight, I won’t fret about it not doing its job . . . at least not quite yet.

Going into week 21 I’m not fretting about whether or not Tremfya will work or not. Instead, I’m observing a pattern emerge on how it works with my psoriasis. Continue reading

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