Tremfya is much, much harder to get than I imagined

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I took this photo of the sunset over the ocean on last month’s Alaska cruise. It reminds me of calmer waters and more joyful times as I persisted in getting my Tremfya prescription right over the past few weeks since.

The journey began in May simply enough: get Tremfya renewed for another year at a new specialty pharmacy. I have continued to use my previous dermatologist’s prescription this year, but with a new doctor I needed a new prescription at a differeent pharmacy starting this summer.

My dermatologist and I decided to request every 6-week dosing, which we both thought would be denied. But it was worth a try, right? No. Denial came swiftly and ended up costing me a lot of time waiting and on the phone.


My dermatologist and I decided to request every 6-week dosing, which we both thought would be denied. But it was worth a try, right? No.


For me simple is never that simple when it comes to getting the newer, more expensive (good) medications to treat severe psoriasis.

(Barely) Qualifying to Receive Tremfya Coverage

After the DENIAL for every 6-week dosing schedule for Tremfya, I was glad to see they approved every 8-week schedule. It’s what I expected anyhow since it makes financial sense for the insurance provider to not pay more than it has to, even though I’ve shown I need a higher frequency dosing.

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With that letter describing how 6-week dosing is not covered, WHA did explain the criteria for receiving coverage for Tremfya. I couldn’t believe how incredibly restrictive the criteria are, including failing two of the newer medications/biologics:

WHA [Western Health Advantage] covers Tremfya when all the following criteria is met:

[1] when prescribed for moderate to severe plaque psoriasis confirmed by a dermatologist (psoriasis affects 10% or more of the body; psoriasis involves hands, feet, and neck or genitalia).

AND

[2] prescribed by a dermatologist

AND

[3] the patient has tried and failed topical therapy (e.g., Dovonex, Tazorac, or other topical steroids),

AND

[4] documented failure or clinically significant adverse effects to one of the following therapies alone or in combination, unless contraindicated: methotrexate or (if methotrexate in contraindicated) cyclosporine, acitretin, or a trial with PUVA or UVB for at least 3 months unless intolerant,

AND

[5] documented failure or significant adverse effects to at least two of the following: Humira, Otezla, Stelara, or Cosentyx.

Initial approvals are considered for 3 months to assess patient’s response and renewals for one year.


I couldn’t believe how incredibly restrictive the criteria are to receive Tremfya, including failing two of the newer medications/biologics.


This is how I imagine the insurance provider reviewer went about his job when fe came to my case: Continue reading →