Family

How My Wife and I Support Each Other Through Chronic Illness

Howard Chang and his wife Lori found that being open about their chronic conditions brought them closer together.

Lori and I took this picture at the spot we got engaged in 1993 near Ghiradelli Square in San Francisco. It’s one of my favorite recent pictures of us together.

Happy Valentine’s Day to my dear wife, Lori! I can’t believe we met about 25 years ago at U.C. Davis as undergraduates. We bonded very quickly over the experiences of living with lifelong health condtions. Those health conditions persist to this day, with a few added to the picture as we become middle-aged. I would even say that psoriasis helped me find my wife

I wrote the following article for The Itch to Beat Psoriasis on Everyday Health a couple years ago on ways to support a loved one with chronic illness. I’m adding it here below as a reminder on Valentine’s Day of how far we have come through each other’s support and care.

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3 Ways to Support a Loved One With Chronic Illness

Finding the perfect gift for my wife, Lori, is always tricky. That’s because it’s not easy to express how much she means to me. She’s stood by as my main support through everything for more than 20 years, including living with a guy who has severe psoriasis.

As a minister, I officiate weddings and work closely with couples preparing for marriage. I always tell them that the center of the ceremony is the vows. The vow to love “in sickness and in health until death do us part” strikes me as especially solemn.

Many young couples sitting across from me do not truly comprehend the impact “in sickness” can have on their future lives. I know that Lori and I didn’t when we married in our early- and mid-twenties.

We hit it off immediately when we met as college students at the University of California, Davis. The two of us could speak for hours about anything and everything. We could especially relate on so many levels when talking about living with serious health conditions.

Lori was born with spina bifida, a neural tube defect that leaves the spinal cord and nerves open to damage. Doctors call hers a one-in-a-million case thanks to successful neurosurgery a few hours after birth. The condition did leave her with incontinence and neuromuscular weakness, but it could’ve left her incapacitated in a wheelchair.

The two of us could speak for hours about anything and everything. We could especially relate on so many levels when talking about living with serious health conditions.

Every year, I accompanied Lori to an all-morning spina bifida clinic. She stayed in an exam room while medical providers from nine different specialities, including neurology, urology, and nursing, checked her. After lunch, they discussed the patient’s condition and gave recommendations for follow-up.

During one visit, her worsening incontinence took center stage. The doctors and nurses couldn’t find a solution, suggesting possible surgery. I felt helpless as I witnessed her daily struggle trying to work and be a mom while emotionally frustrated by her condition. It took years to figure out how to best manage the incontinence, though no surgery was necessary.

My psoriasis also posed its challenges for Lori. She didn’t really understand or have much knowledge about the condition when we met, or during the early years of our marriage.

Lori admits she thought it was just a manageable itchy rash … nothing much to worry about. It would flare up at times, but there was oral medication, topical treatments, and dermatology appointments to get through it. Besides, Lori’s mom was facing terminal cancer, and the ensuing family drama after her death definitely took priority.

On the journey, Lori and I learned how to better support each other while managing our own anxieties, fears, and frustrations. Drawing from our experience, we brainstormed a few tips for people in support roles as they care for the most important people in their lives. Continue reading

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psoriasis, Psoriasis Treatments

16 Weeks with Tremfya: The Verdict?

August 9, 2017 Huntington Beach, CA. I took this photo just before starting Tremfya in August in one of my favorite spots in the world.

I started my Tremfya (guselkumab) journey on Monday, August 21, 2017. Sixteen weeks is an important point to evaluate as clinical trials use this time to evaluate new medications. On December 11, after three injections (week 0, 4, 12), I reached that interim endpoint.

The clinical trial data shows that more than 90% of patients showed greater or equal to 75% improvement at 16 weeks. When I took that first injection, I hoped my body would assimilate Tremfya safely, while effectively shutting down the psoriasis inflammation all over my skin.

Below I evaluate my experience with Tremfya at 16 weeks. The following “verdicts” reflect a moment in time, and certainly are not final. As a disclaimer, my observations are from my personal experience only, and should not be construed as making any claims or predictions for anyone else who might try Tremfya.

How well is Tremfya working for me?

Quite well! After a roller coaster few months with tapering off of cyclosporine, atopic dermatitis (eczema) flares, and super stressful stretches of work, I’m amazed at the level of psoriasis clearance. I’m still on a small, small dose of cyclosporine, but no other biologic gave me this much skin clearance working together with even higher doses of cyclosporine.

After a roller coaster few months, I’m amazed at the level of psoriasis clearance with Tremfya.

I have yet to see my dermatologist this month (that is another story altogether trying to get an appointment with him), so I can’t say what percentage improvement I’ve experienced. But my guess is at least the 75% clearance, and probably more.

I promised photos in my last update. The following photos from July, October, and and December don’t lie.

Continue reading

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psoriasis, Skln Care

5 Psoriasis and Eczema Winter Skin Care Tips

I published this blog for The Itch to Best Psoriasis on Everyday Health in January this year. This reprint has a few update modifications. Great reminders for myself as I ward off rashes and try to control the dryness that heating causes in the winter cold. 


Every winter, I sense the need to adjust how I care for my skin. Freezing cold night temperatures give way to cold, shortened days. My wife likes to turn up the heater, as do my workplace and the stores I frequent. I enjoy a hot shower too. But I know that my psoriasis and eczema don’t necessarily take well to dry, heated air and long, hot showers.

It could be the stress of the holidays, it might be because my medications have lost their effectiveness, or it could just be winter. Whatever the cause, I’m needing to take extra measures to make sure my skin is well managed and cared for.

When I visited my dermatologist, Dr. Emanual Maverakis of the University of California, Davis Health System last year, I wondered what winter skincare tips he and his resident Dr. Tatyana Petukhova might have for those of us living with psoriasis and eczema.

My years of experience have helped me develop ways to manage any inevitable winter flare-ups. Here are my five recommendations with a few of my doctors’ thoughts peppered in.

1. Be Sure to Moisturize and Humidify

Without a doubt, this tip to moisturize is the one my dermatologists recommended first. Dr. Maverakis noted that  using heaters in the winter dries out the skin, so more moisturizing is needed. That’s my experience as well.

I took a couple of climatology classes in college. One professor used the analogy of two different-sized buckets to explain relative humidity. If you have a small bucket, and it’s 80 percent full of water, then you would say it’s quite full.  But if you put that same amount of water in a big bucket, it might only be 20 percent full.

Cold air is like the small bucket, and hot air is like the large bucket. When cold air is heated up, as it often is indoors in the winter, the relative humidity drops. Unless water is added back into the air, such as with a humidifier, the dry air will dry out your skin.

Dry skin will easily become itchy and irritated. In the winter, it seems to dry out even faster than usual.

I’ve noticed my skin is like a hygrometer, a device that measures humidity. I can tell when my skin is dry and needs more moisturizer. Plus, dry skin will easily become itchy and irritated. In the winter, it seems to dry out even faster than usual.

When moisturizing, I start with a layer of a lotion with ceramides (mainly for eczema) to add moisture, then lock in the moisture with a thicker, petroleum-based cream. If I am moisturizing after a bath or shower, I moisturize within a couple of minutes of getting out to trap the moisture in my skin. It took me some time experimenting with different moisturizers, and talking with my doctors, before I settled on a regimen that works for me.

Finding the Right Moisturizer for Psoriasis & Eczema

Having a humidifier in the living room, bedroom, and the office helps too — especially during those cold and dry times. Dr. Petukhova also recommended using humidifiers, noting the need to “clean them regularly” and use a humidity level “that feels comfortable.”

2. Avoid Long Hot Baths or Showers

Simply put, hot water dries out your skin, and that’s generally not good for psoriasis or eczema. My dermatologists noted this tip as second important after moisturizing. But I confess I like to bathe in hot water in the winter. When it’s cold outside, or even cool, doesn’t everyone enjoy a hot shower or bath? After seeing Dr. Maverakis, I turned back the temperature of my shower and cut down the time.

I also will take 10- to 15-minute soothing baths. I sprinkle an over-the-counter oatmeal bath packet into the water as the bath is being drawn, then I add some moisturizing oil. When I get out of the tub, I put on extra layers of moisturizer. This system seems to be working well so far, but it’s hard to give up the hot water.

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psoriasis, Psoriasis Treatments

14 Weeks with Tremfya: What’s Next?

20 Weeks with Tremfya: Read the Instructions! (4th Injection)

24 Weeks with Tremfya: A Pattern Emerges

I found this photo online that reflects how I feel–looking up for answers into the gray building and sky, not knowing what’s the next move.

For much of the last year I looked forward to taking Tremfya (guselkumab) to treat my severe chronic psoriasis. My dermatologist suggested I hold off on the new IL-17A inhibitors until it was FDA approved.

I continued with a combination of topical steroids, Enbrel (etanercept), and Neoral (cyclosporine). That regimen worked fairly well for some years. But it seemed Enbrel lost effectiveness over the years, and cyclosporine’s long-term side effects started to develop. A little over 14 weeks ago I finally started Tremfya.

Now almost three months into the new treatment I am asking a question I hoped not to need to ask: what’s next?

Skin Condition Update

I won’t make any final or definitive evaluation of Tremfya’s effectiveness quite yet. Week 16 is when the study trials report efficacy anyhow. Charts show the medication continuing to work for weeks after, even though the curve flattens. I can say that overall psoriasis is under better control than with Enbrel and higher dose cyclosporine. Continue reading

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